SM User Types


begumsemis

There are some different types of social media users on the web.

Some of them are born to lead and the others to follow. In social media, the categorization is not that strict. However, there are still some leaders and followers as in all other aspects of life.

It is really important to know the user categories in order to place the campaigns on social media properly. When placing an ad/campaign, the most important thing is the type of audience that will see the ad/campaign.

Here is the categorization of your audience.

p.s: In the infographic, the effect of social media before purchase is also mentioned. Please check-out ZMOT for details. (Zero-Moment-Of-Truth by Google)

View original post

social media and coffee… two of my favorite things


The Psychology Of Facebook (INFOGRAPHIC)


LinkedIn in Numbers [infographic]


life portOfolio

LinkedIn calls itself “the largest professional network”

I would have to agree with that…

~*~

LinkedIn in numbers

~*~

So if you are a newbie, here is an easy and funny way to see what LinkedIn is all about!

*zoom in*

View original post

Facebook Reach. Another drop in visibility. Now what?


everything but average

Facebook Reach Everything but Average

In the last couple of weeks everybody is talking about the huge decrease in facebook’s post visibility. Yep, algorithm changed again and now the most a brand’s page can achieve, in terms of reach, is something like 10% of its total fans. Let’s face it, it’s a very small percentage so, what do you do?

First I’ll tell you what not to do: cry about it! But, as usual, the crowd is mumbling, they cannot believe it, it’s an outrage. It is! Facebook makes you pay to reach people you already paid to have them in your page. It doesn’t have ethics written all over it but it is business and it was expected thus it’s you that must adapt! I’m doing that in the last 3 months.

If you follow the blog, you’ll know that I’m a strong believer in content’s power. The force, in social media and particularly…

View original post 190 more words

The 50 Best Designed Facebook Brand Cover Photos


THE EMPTY CANVAS EXPERIENCE

Facebook cover photos have been around for close to a year now and brands and businesses all over the world have been coming up with lots of imaginative and innovative ways of showcasing their products and services within the confines of the design. We wanted to gather up 50 of the best examples here to provide you with some inspiration for your own designs.

Drinks

Coca Cola are on the list as you would fully expect and their page is always full of great design and fun happy branding.

Red Bull has been getting a lot of attention recently because of their mad space stunt and its cover photo takes full advantage of that media event.

Pepsi has a huge following globally and it tries to fight back against Coca Cola with a celebrity lead approach on their page.

Guinness is one of the best known…

View original post 1,249 more words

Social vs. Search Smackdown


Digital Warehouse Marketing Group - DMCM1213

A battle of Internet Marketing: Who comes out on top?

MDG Advertising welcomes us with this Video Infographic and shows us why so many Digital Marketers are integrating Social Media and Search Marketing within their own Marcoms Strategies.

To Read More: MDG

View original post

Twitter Showdown: Coca-Cola V Redbull


Brands Need To Treat Computer Screens Like TV Screens


By Steve Olenski

“Lord knows I am not the smartest person in the world, the brightest bulb, the sharpest knife or any other euphemism you want to trot out connoting intelligence. But one fairly smart thing I said (at least I think it’s somewhat smart) over the past couple of years was that ‘people need to start looking at their computer screen or monitor the same way they look at their TV.”

Not exactly rocket science when you stop and look at your monitor. Is it not a box-shaped item that is akin to your TV set? Of course it is.

And you don’t read TV, do you? Of course you don’t.tv

Well unless you count reading the now incessant scrolls that every news/sports network has on the bottom of its screen.

But by and large you don’t read TV, you watch it. You watch the images. You watch the video. You watch the film.

So why should your computer be any different.

Now, before I go on, let’s one thing perfectly clear. I am in no way espousing the belief that traditional TV is dead; that we’ll be watching TV on our computers in the near future and our current TVs will become antiques.

Nor am I advocating the removal of all text from all Internet sites as fast as humanly possible to be replaced by videos and/or pictures. Being a writer who makes his living off the writing of words which appear on computer screens, I would kind of like to see words stay for a while.

No, I am merely pointing out something I think that has been obvious for quite some time and is now coming to fruition. And that is that people, AKA consumers, AKA the folks who buy your products, services and wares Mr. & Mrs. Brand, prefer to “see” rather than “read” when it comes to the deluge of information they are bombarded with day in, day out on the information super highway. (Boy, that’s an old term, isn’t it?)

The folks at M Booth recently got together with SimplyMeasure to measure consumer engagement data on the Internet and social media networks.

Some highlights of the following infographic which is pretty self-explanatory. (NOTE: The infographic also includes a brief timeline of the “visual revolution” from just the start of 2012 alone.)

  • On Facebook, videos are shared 12 times more than text posts and links combined
  • Photos are Liked twice as much as text only updates
  • 42% of all Tumblr posts are pictures
  • Pinterest, the photo-driven social media phenomenon, is now referring more traffic than TwitterStumbleUponLinkedIn and Google Plus

So, Mr. Brand Marketer & Mrs. Brand Manager and anyone else who is responsible for hits the Internet airwaves – especially those that hit the social media networks, try and remember the computer/TV analogy and instead of “just” posting words, include and image or video to help tell the story.

 

Read more: http://socialmediatoday.com/steve-olenski

Social Marketing:


 It’s still… All About  Content!

Brands both big and small across the globe are looking for the key to social marketing success. The answer may surprise you: it’s STILL all about your content. In fact, it’s so important, we devoted an entire series of white papers to content marketing, delving specifically into four components of effective content marketing: content creationevent sponsorshipsocial media contests, and understanding Facebook EdgeRank.

After you’ve performed a social audit to find your customers and competitors on social channels, and developed your social goals, in accordance with your overall business goals, it’s time to think about developing content. When you think about the kind of content generation that will jumpstart audience growth on social channels, it’s important to focus on two distinct areas:

  1. Proactive Content
  2. Reactive Content

You will likely be managing content across multiple channels at once. In order to avoid feeling overwhelmed with platform management and scalable content creation by channel, consider proactively scheduling a portion of your social content. It can provide a solid base of content, providing you ample cushion to focus your limited resources instead on monitoring and responding to timely and relevant developments as they occur – or ‘reactive’ content. We’ll share how Starbucks has successfully implemented this strategy to amass a Twitter following of over 2.76 million users.

 

Proactive Content – 70% of Your Content

Although proactively scheduling 100% of your content will certainly fill your social channels with content, this is not a recommended strategy.  Scheduled content is not conducive to authentic, immediate audience engagement. While all brands share branded messages, like company updates and product offers, it’s not all your consumers are looking for. Promotional and evergreen content should be supplemented with engaging, real-time content to keep up with the ‘here and now’.

 

Best practices for scheduling proactive content show that 70% of content can be scheduled early in the week, which allows room for reactive content. In the example below, Starbucks spreads the word about their program ‘treat receipt’, in which a customer may bring a receipt verifying an AM purchase to a store in the afternoon for a discounted afternoon pick-me-up. This is a perfect example of a message that can be scheduled ahead of time.

Image

 

Reactive Content – 30% of Your Content

The other 30% of content should, in turn, be reactive content focused on two areas: popular, timely topics and appropriate audience dialog. Staying abreast of trending topics allows you to leverage popular conversations to receive increased reach and engagement. Connecting trends to how they affect your audience will increase your opportunity for growth. The Nashville, Tennessee tourism board used the trending topic #tourismchat to prompt engaged chat users to plan a trip to Nashville.

Image

 
ImageResponding to users who have engaged directly with your brand through content moderation is another component of reactive content. Responding to your fans and followers in a timely manner increases your ability to maintain an engaged audience. The key is offering quick, positive, and helpful responses. Starbucks makes a personal connection with a store visitor, who shared an anecdote from his visit. Starbucks took the time to respond, providing Josh a closed-loop social experience.

 

Successful social marketing requires strategy and planning. By scheduling a portion of content proactively, marketers can spend their remaining time focused on creating authentic, immediate relationships with their audience, either by responding directly to users, or being active in broader digital discussions. For a closer look at specific components of a content marketing strategy, check out our newest resources on content creation, event sponsorship, social media contests, and understanding Facebook EdgeRank.

By Mike Lewis

Read more: http://socialmediatoday.com

 

A CEO Speaks Out About…the truth outside the Web


Ronen Shilo is the CEO of Israel’s largest Internet company, Conduit.

“People are more interesting than companies

…so effective leaders are responsible for getting out there and spreading the good word.”

Here’s the paradox: I run a company that’s incredibly visible, but not that well known. Conduit has 260 million users around the world, but our brand isn’t top of mind. It’s not even mid-mind, to be honest. One of those reasons is that I had never made a personal effort to get out in front of the company and act as a public advocate.

That’s changed now. I’m becoming more visible, leaving many people wondering why I’ve decided to emerge from my cave. Have I developed a newfound urge for the spotlight? Am I jealous of Zuckerberg? Why the sudden availability?

They’re all questions worth answering. They’re questions that got me thinking as well.

Into The Spotlight

I didn’t just wake up one morning and decide it was time to become more visible. It was a process. But I can tell you that I always believed that the responsibility of a CEO includes getting out there, and I had been thinking for a long time that I should start representing the company more actively and consistently. Plus, I realized that I wasn’t doing myself any favors by resisting the exposure.

I’m essentially a product guy. People at Conduit are bored of hearing me say that if the product isn’t right, nothing else matters. But I was also telling myself secretly that if the product is right, then nothing else matters either. In other words, a great product will speak for–and sell–itself. Anything else is just frivolous sizzle.

But I learned quickly that my thinking was faulty. There’s a marketing and media side to the success equation that’s really pivotal. And I probably used “it’s all about the product” as an excuse to stay behind the scenes because I don’t really enjoy the media whir.

Some people have asked me if there’s a right time for a CEO to become an active presence in the media.

Like most things in business, there is no one answer. It depends on the personality of the CEO, how competitive the market is, and how mature your product is, among many other variables.

But these are the key questions that can shed light on some answers: What are you trying to accomplish and how do you measure success? Do you want to raise awareness with opinion makers? Are you looking to raise visibility because you are, or will be, raising money? Do you want to attract new customers or consumers? Are you starved for talent and in need of improving your recruiting? Or does your giant ego need some stroking?

While all of these questions can be important, you need to figure out what’s most important to you, and how it all fits in with your objectives. Go deep before you go out. Brian Chesky, CEO of Airbnb, has done just that. He’s been terrific as a visible, sometimes in-your-face, evangelist for his brand. But often, I see a lot of CEOs working the media without a clear point of view about what they want to accomplish.

I realize now that I should have done this earlier, but I enjoyed taking the time to focus on product, on building the company. (And on family.)

As I look back, there wasn’t a burning need for anyone to know who I was in the beginning. We had a rapid uptake of our product by publishers, so I didn’t feel compelled to be visible. Soon after, toolbars–our primary business–began to get beaten up by the media. It was unfair, but so what? Life is unfair. Reporters didn’t really understand what we did.

I couldn’t help but think that if I had been out there more, I would have been able to push back. To strongly argue for our company and our brand. If I couldn’t change their opinions, I would have at least created a dialogue. I think we lost the opportunity to shift the perception of the toolbar. Now it’s too late to do that in any meaningful way. I’m not worried though, because I know there will be other opportunities to redefine our company.

So my advice to others is to be part of the dialogue sooner rather than later. It will benefit your company and your employees to do so. True, your product needs to mature, but it’s easy to hide behind the maturity excuse, particularly if you’re not really a media junkie at heart.

Visibility And Value

If I were hustling for an IPO though, everything would have been different.

There’s no question about that. CEOs and founders contemplating an IPO recognize that visibility translates to asset value. That’s actually why many Israeli companies hire an American CEO; they know that it will help achieve higher levels of awareness, whether for an IPO or an acquisition. But since neither of those is the case for my company, I had more reason to continue to operate Conduit under the radar. It wasn’t a conscious plan. Like many things, it was unplanned yet retrospectively, right.

Now, the more I get out there, the more I’m amused by the differences in global media. The American and the Israeli media are as different as a hot dog and falafel.

Cultural differences are manifested everywhere and they’re only heightened in the journalistic world. The media in Israel are tough. Compared with U.S. reporters, they’re even brutal. American audiences are much more generous. Some Americans may disagree, but having been exposed to both cultures, I can tell it like it is.

I remember being at a conference in the U.S. where a CEO gave a presentation that was not impressive, to say the least. In Israel, he would have been torn apart, whereas Americans are more polite. Your social rules create an atmosphere of friendliness. I guess that’s because we’re in survival mode all the time, and pleasantries are a luxury Israelis don’t get too often. Or at least they’re seen as one.

Last time I was in the U.S., a reporter began an interview by proclaiming, “I hate toolbars.” It was so unusual that I was really taken aback and felt for a second like I was at home in Israel. So forget media training. My advice to any American CEO is to come over here, expose yourself to some reporters, and get toughened up.

I’m also convinced that differing CEO backgrounds play a large role in how they relate to the media.

I once worked for a sales-driven CEO who started every day by asking everyone, “What did you sell yesterday?” He saw the media as one giant sales call. I’m from the product and engineering CEO track, not the sales or marketing side. This gives me the flexibility to speak about the product, the vision of the company, and how what we’re building delivers on that.

If a CEO gets out there too soon, especially when he or she is from the sales or straight marketing side, there’s a risk of overselling. Hype can make a fast difference, but in today’s world of media scrutiny, it has a dangerously short shelf life. It quickly starts to rot and smell.

Personal Brand Takes A Backseat

As far as the ‘Ronen Shilo’ brand, I don’t think about it much. My public brand is no different than my private behavior. Those who know me would agree that I don’t put on a mask when I speak to the media.

But I do want people to start to think of me and Conduit in the same breath. That’s a good thing. Whether it’s Bill Gates (before he started giving his money away) or Larry Ellison, or many others, the company benefits when it’s strongly linked to an individual. People are more interesting than companies. So it’s better for Conduit if I’m out there, and I certainly want to do what’s best for my company.

Except, you won’t see me making any speeches in the future. I like the intimacy of a one-on-one interview. For me, it’s important to look someone in the eye, to read body language, to be in tune with the conversation. If you get thrown a curve ball, you can handle it. And I like an environment where surprises happen.

One thing I really don’t like is a scripted speech. Once, when I was in the army, I had to give a lesson to a reserve group. They allocated an hour. Sixty minutes of air time! I finished what I had to say in five minutes. I was happy and they were happy.

The End Of The Media Hermit

After taking a breath of fresh air, I don’t think I can head back to my cave any time soon.

I have to admit that I can get energized by meeting with the press, particularly with really smart reporters who’ve done their homework. (When it’s the other way, and I have to educate a reporter who doesn’t have a clue about what we do, it’s frustrating. I’d never hire someone who hasn’t spent time studying us, so why should I waste my time with a reporter who didn’t gather any background information?)

At the same time, intelligent reporters can be challenging. They know the category and tend to ask some provocative questions that really get me thinking. They’re out talking to a lot of smart people, so they have a perspective I might not otherwise hear. Learning from a reporter, that’s something I never would have expected when I was in my media hermit period.

Come to think of it, I also never expected that coming out of my shell to answer people’s questions would, in turn, get a lot of my own questions answered.

BY RONEN SHILO|
MARCH 2, 2012

Read more: http://www.fastcompany.com/