Branding from Design to Retail: Apple Shows the Future


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It is 5AM. Black Friday. They still have a turkey hangover but wake up anyway with coupons in hand to get the best deals in sight. We as marketers push out all the advertising in sight to get people to buy certain products and go to certain stores. It is the one day of year that consumers are guaranteed to wake up at all hours of the night to go shopping to get a few extra dollars off of their gifts. While strolling through the mall, there is one store in particular that has no deep discounts, but ironically is the most crowded. The Apple Store.

The in-store experience at Apple is the ultimate definition of experiential marketing in retail. The store is very refined and classically modern. The Apple store in fact looks and feels like one big Apple device. Like his products, Steve Jobs wanted everything simple and…

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Steve Jobs’ Biggest Contribution (That No One Is Talking About)


Steve Jobs' Biggest Contribution (That No One Is Talking About)

Ask several people to name what they think Steve Jobs‘ biggest contribution has been, and you will get a variety of responses. Sure, he has brought us some amazing innovations, and millions of us own (or want to own) them. There’s the iPod, the iPad, and the i-everything else!

But when you get down to it, it really wasn’t Jobs who did it alone—it was his team. But Steve did do one thing that started a positive trend that will last for decades or longer. And that contribution is so big, so important, that by some divine guidance it was inserted into his name. Steve created jobs. And lots of them.

The foundation

Steve Jobs built amazing teams. It is the fundamental component to entrepreneurial success, and when done perfectly it is the component to grand economic success. Jobs is an entrepreneur through and through and he has built a company that has brought benefits to all consumers. (Shoot, right now I’m listening to music on my iPod, downloading music from iTunes, and I just got a text on my iPhone!)

With the combination of great people making great products, jobs get created. Lots of them. Steve’s own company grew from a startup to having over 7,000 employees by the time he left, the first go-around. Having 7,000 employees seems vast, but it didn’t stop there. When he returned to the company, he increased Apple to over 46,500 full-time employees. And that, my friend, is where the ripple effect in business can be so powerful.

Building buyers

Having nearly 47,000 full-time workers adds up to a lot of work. It also creates a lot of wealth for a lot of people who go on to consume services and products (they need Keurig’s and pool boys too, you know). But it doesn’t stop there. Think about all the people who support Apple products (beyond the Apple stores). Think about all the companies that formed to create programs for Apple devices.

In fact, Apple recently announced that they have topped 15 billion app downloads from the App Store. Their store has over 425,000 apps available, which have been created by a myriad of companies. And it doesn’t stop there, either. For example, Google shows that there are over 40,000 searches per month for the term “iPad sleeve.” Also, earlier this year, Random House made their entire catalog of books (all 17,000 of them) available in the Apple iBookstore. More people working…because of Jobs (double entendre intended).

These examples alone are enough to show how Jobs’ innovations have had a ripple effect, from those who work for him to those who have developed apps for his products—and are growing their own companies and fulfilling their own entrepreneurial dreams. There are countless people and businesses making a profit from his creations, including those selling sleeves, holders, accessories, stickers, you name it! Apple products create a wide variety of markets for those selling add-ons for those products.

From writers who cover stories about Apple’s technology and write books that will be sold to iPad users, to programmers who are busy developing new apps that keep people loving their iPhone, a lot of people are impacted by this company. A lot of people have jobs, that wouldn’t otherwise exist.

Rippling out

Jobs has done something that most entrepreneurs can only dream of achieving. But there is no doubt that others will be able to replicate it, in one form or another. Perhaps you will.

The goal is to create something that will touch a lot of people and put them to work, either directly or indirectly. That’s what he has done, thus giving work to many people and creating an empire.

The result of what he has accomplished is a company’s P&L that is now bigger than the economy of many countries. It is hard to find a lot of people downing Apple, because it is touching so many lives in a positive way. Either people are reaping great rewards by making money from the company or from ancillary products, or they are using the products themselves, or both. Jobs has create a jobs ripple effect. That is nothing short of amazing. Thanks, Steve!

Read more: http://www.webconnection.gr

The New iPhone 5


The iPhone 5 Review

And just like that, months and months of breathless speculation have finally come to an end. Apple’s Phil Schiller has just officially announced the new iPhone 5 at the company’s massive press event here in San Francisco, less than a year since its predecessor was unveiled.

Some of the news won’t come as much of a shock considering the sheer volume of rumors and leaks lately (even Apple let some details slip earlier today) — I’m going to resist the temptation to pontificate on every new feature as it’s revealed (for now, anyway), so let’s get right down to it.

THE IPHONE 5

  • We can finally put the debate to rest — Apple’s newest mobile juggernaut is called the iPhone 5 (despite actually being the sixth iPhone to hit the market). It’s 20% lighter than the iPhone 4S, 18% thinner, and crafted out of (what else?) glass and aluminum.
  • Pre-orders for the iPhone 5 will begin on Friday, September 14, and the device will ship to lucky consumers starting on September 21. As usual, the device will be available in 16, 32, and 64GB models, which will cost $199, $299, and $399 respectively with a two-year contract from AT&T, Verizon, or Sprint.
  • The long-rumored (and handsome) two-toned design is indeed legitimate, as is the new iPhone’s larger 4-inch Retina Display. And yes, that 16:9 display runs at 1136 x 640 with five rows of icons. According to Schiller, it’s “the most accurate display in the industry” because the touch sensors are embedded in the display as well.
  • As expected, Apple has also unveiled a brand new chipset for the iPhone 5: the A6, which Schiller says is a full two times faster than the A5 chip in the iPhone 4S
  • The iPhone 4S’s battery life wasn’t anything to write home about, but the iPhone 5 seems equipped to do much better — 8 hours of 3G talk time, as well as 8 hours of 3G and LTE web browsing to be precise.
  • The iPhone’s audio system has been bolstered with a smaller (but improved speaker). There are also now three microphones in the mix: one on the front, one on the back, and another on the bottom.
  • That oft-rumored miniature Dock Connector is real: it’s all-digital, has eight pins and it’s called “Lightning.” Yes, there’s an adapter for it, but no word yet on exactly what it will cost you.

CONNECTIVITY

  • It’s hardly a surprise at this point, but the iPhone 5 packs support for Sprint, Verizon, and AT&T’s LTE networks here in the States. What’s really impressive is that combined that LTE support with 2.4GHz and 5GHz 802.11n Wi-Fi onto a single “ultra fast” chip.
  • Despite what a handful of leaks pointed to in the weeks leading up to the event, there’s been no mention of an integrated NFC chip yet.

CAMERA

  • Smartphone cameras are really starting to give their point-and-shoot brethren a run for their money (think Nokia’s PureView and HTC’s ImageSense tech), but instead of running up the megapixel count, Apple has stuck with an 8-megapixel camera. That said, the backside-illuminated sensor is smaller, and features much better low-light performance (finally!).
  • App developers may be bummed to know that the camera now also has a built-in panorama mode. The revamped camera also supports 1080p video capture, and users can now snap photos while recording video at the same time. I wonder how HTC feels about that.

 

Read more: http://techcrunch.com/