Google AdWords Made Simple


CreativeWorks Marketing

Today’s economy is challenging for many businesses, but it’s an even bigger challenge for the SMB owner, who is forced to use increasingly smaller marketing budgets to increase brand recognition and drive sales through lead generation tactics.  One such lead gen tactic is Google AdWords. You’ve seen those ads that appear on the side of the page every time you search for something on Google. Businesses bid for this online advertising through Google AdWords. All you have to do is create an ad, and choose specific search keywords which you would like to target, and, voila! Your ads might appear on Google, next to the search results. The idea is that people interested in your product/service can simply click on your ad to either make a purchase or learn more about your company.

Sounds simple, right? Well, from a conceptual standpoint, it is. In practice, however, we have found…

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Rumor: Google Wants To Acquire Facial Recognition Startup Viewdle For $30M


Google, according to a report by Forbes, has acquiredViewdle, an augmented reality and facial recognition startup. Forbes says the price was likely around $30 million, but we are still trying to confirm both the acquisition and the price.

Update: Viewdle just returned our email: “We do not have any comment.” Google has not yet responded to our emails.

Viewdle, which won the 2008 LeWeb startup competition, previously received funding, including a $10 million Series B round, from numerous venture firms, including KCP Capital, Anthem Venture Partners, Best Buy Capital, and Qualcomm. The company was founded in the Ukraine in 2006 and is currently headquartered in Silicon Valley with operations across Europe and South America, including, of course, Ukraine.

Its apps, including SocialCamera and games like ThirdEye, are currently all available on Android, though the company is also currently testing an iOS version of its Face Recognition SDK. Viewdle also own a number of patents related to facial recognition.

Google previously bought at least two similar startups in the past. In July 2011, the companyacquired the Pittsburgh-based facial recognition company PittPatt and all the way back in 2006, itbought the Germany biometrics company Neven Vision.”

 

By: FREDERIC LARDINOIS

Read more: http://techcrunch.com/

Local Bussines Listings – Claim your site


HAVE YOU CLAIMED YOUR LOCAL BUSINESS LISTING ON THESE 21 SITES?

These sites are great for building local authority, they’re also a factor in how search engines determine your local listing placement.

1.) Kudzu.com

This site was launched in 2006 and in February of 2009 integrated Facebook Connect onsite. The site boasts 4 million consumer reviews, over 27,000 local deals, and a domain authority of 78. Quantcast measures the traffic at an estimated 678,000 site visitors per month. Kudzu is a fairly well known site so it might already be on your radar, but if not it’s certainly worth a look.

2.) LikeList.com

Recently coming out of beta, LikeList.com is a “social-local referral service” with more than 510,000 business “like’s” in the system. LikeList has more than 2 million friend relationships on their current user base. NeatStat.com estimates their monthly traffic at about 20,000 visitors. Just recently the site launched Sharelists – “A collaborative list for groups of people with interests or tastes in common to share what they like and help each other”.

  • List Your Business for Free Here

3.) OpenList.com

Touting itself as “your local guide”, OpenList.com  was founded in 2003 in Seattle. Initially the site just focused on restaurants, hotels and attraction listings. Today it is open to all businesses. A domain authority of 44 and site traffic estimates from NeatState.com at 2.5 million a month, the site has seen incredible growth since 2003. To get on this site you’ll likely need to submit toLocaleze and eventually will get added to the site. Or inquire on their site here.

4.) MatchPoint.com

Helping users find the right business, MatchPoint.com has been around since 2007. In Vertical Measures’ post “10 Good Citations You Can Get Right Now” we featured MatchPoint in 2009, and the sites value still holds true. Quantcast estimates monthly traffic at 12,000 visitors, which in comparison to other sites is quite small. MatchPoint, however, offers free business listings and additional advertising options like most of the sites on this list so they are worth a look.

5.) Jayde.com

Jayde isn’t so much a local search site per se, it’s more so a B2B and business search engine that’s been around for many years. You’ve probably heard about it; the site has been around since 1996. Quantcast estimates traffic at 13,600 visitors a month, and domain authority on the site is 76.

6.) YellowBot.com

YellowBot lets you “do. tag. write. share.” since 2006. With an average of 744,000 visitors a month, the site stays active and is fairly authoritative with a domain authority score of 61. They also offer international versions of YellowBot for Canadians and users inBermudaTip: Add a variety of tags to your listings for better optimization.

 

7.) MacRaesBlueBook.com

MacRae’s Blue Book is America’s original industrial directory since 1893. Today with more than 1 million active users monthly, the site can help users find the industrial and manufacturing products and services they’re looking for. They have a wide array of categories your listing can fit into, and they offer free listings.

8.) Zidster.com

Helping online users find coupons and local businesses is what Zidster is all about. With an estimated half a million visitors a month (according to NeatStat.com), the site has grown in popularity since launching in 2007-2008.

9.) iBegin.com

iBegin provides businesses in the US and Canada with listings for free, and helps users find your businesses through their incredibly easy to use local search site. The site has been around since 2006, and since then has grown to an estimated 1.5 million visitor per month site (according to NeatStat.com).

10.) MerchantCircle.com

This popular site once talked about by many local search experts is still alive and kicking, allowing businesses to claim listings, respond to reviews, and create deals for their prospective customers. The site averages a whopping 5.8 million visitors a month. If you still haven’t found the time to claim your listing – do it today! Tip: Use the coupon functionality on MerchantCircle to get more traction with your weekly/monthly deals.

11.) MatchLocal.com

Get found online with Match Local. A fairly new site online, their parent company Matchbin has been around for quite awhile revolutionizing the traditional media industry. NeatStat.com estimates MatchLocal’s traffic at a few thousand visitors a month. While the site still has some growing to do, it’s yet another place to get a listing for your business.

Niche Local Search Sites

Do your due diligence when finding sites to add your business listing to. It might seem daunting, especially after you’ve added your listing to the hundreds of sites already out there. Tip: Set aside an hour or two hours a month to look for new sites to list your business on. Search for niche local search sites that are specific to your area.

Below I’ve listed a few that I’ve found that have a decent amount of traffic on a monthly basis and are fairly authoritative. Tip: Use advanced search commands like “local keyword directory” “city/state” “claim listing” or  “local keyword” “city/state” “submit business listing” to find sites specific to your location. Or –try these search commands in Rand Fishkin’s post.

12.)  WickedLocal.com

13.) Gazlo.com

14.) ShopCity.com

  • Over 8,000 local marketplaces including ShopPaloAlto.com, ShopBuffalo.com, & ShopCorona.com.
  • Over 35,00 estimated visitors per month
  • Add your business for free today!

15.) WebLocal.ca

  • Canadian specific
  • Estimated 1.7 million visitors per month
  • Signup today!

16.) Qype.co.uk

 17.) WeLoveLocal.com

  • UK specific
  • Signup today!

Industry Specific Local Search Sites

Additionally, business owners should look to place listings on sites that are specific to their industry. Whether you’re a local restaurant, doctor, hospital or even an accountant, there are industry specific sites your business should have a listing on. Tip: Use advanced search commands like “industry keyword directory” “city/state” “claim listing” or  “industry keyword” “city/state” “submit business listing” to find sites specific to your industry.

18.) HealthGrades.com

 19.) UrbanSpoon.com

20.) RestaurantRow.com

21.) Ratingz.net

Update

I’ve received quite a few great additional suggestions via the comments, Facebook, and Twitter too. Thanks for your suggestions! Below are a few more sites to add to the list of little known local search sites:

22.) Manta

  • A local search site dedicated to small businesses.
  • Estimated 23 million visitors per month
  • The site has over 30 million business listings!
  • Add your listing for free today!

BY Kaila Strong

Read more: http://sem-group.net


What SEOs can learn from online journalists


Journalists have been frantically learning SEO and social media techniques over recent years, so they can stay ahead online. But now some of them are so skilled that SEO teams could learn a few things from them too. From writing clickable headlines, to using Twitter to network, here are all the journo skills that I’ve learnt by following (no, not stalking!) some of the best in the business…

Monitoring and Targeting

Like most blogs, news sites tend to cover a number of different subjects. For the main newspapers, these tend to be major topics such as politics, finance, property, jobs and so on. However, within those ‘channels’, similar stories often come up again and again – interest rates, house prices, unemployment figures, that kind of thing.

Journalists and editors use analytics programs to check how many readers are visiting each section and which stories are grabbing their interest. That means that they can give more coverage to the stories that really interest their readers, and move other stories further down the hierarchy. This also allows them to maximise click-throughs from their front pages because they know what stories get readers excited.

 

You can replicate this on your own blog or corporate site. Work out what content works best for pageviews, CTRs and purchases. Then ensure these most successful topic areas are well optimised, often updated and well positioned on your website.

Massively successful news resources like the Mail Online and the Huffington Post only reached where they are by endlessly testing and never being entirely satisfied with their websites’ click-through figures. You should do the same.

Using Twitter and Facebook to Research and Network

Anyone who’s used Twitter to any extent knows its power and reach. You can contact almost any other user, anywhere in the world, with a message of just 140 characters (or fewer) this is genuinely revolutionary. For journalists, it’s a whole new way of researching articles, and the #journorequest hashtag has become a first port of call for many when they’re looking for case studies or quotes from members of the public.

Most online news sites now tweet links to their major stories too. A single headline-worthy article can get a significant number of retweets, helping it to reach readers who might otherwise not have seen it. Add to this the Twitter conversations journalists and press representatives hold with each other on a daily basis. For journalists it’s a quick, easy but powerful way to network with other writers and to engage with their readers.

The lessons to be learnt for other webmasters and SEO teams are simple but worth spelling out – ignore Twitter, and your voice is missing from a global conversation. Make sure your best content is being tweeted, use hashtags to help get the message to people who don’t follow you, and aim to widen that audience still further. And don’t allow your Twitter feed to become mundane and overly-corporate. Stay fun and stay engaged. You’ll learn a lot about your customers and it could even help you generate ideas for blog posts and other content.

Although I hear a lot of negativity from SEOs about Facebook (some of them have already disabled their Facebook accounts), journalists use Facebook to engage with their audience and to reach out to a wider audience beyond the niche they operate within. Mia Aquino, The Huffington Post’s social media editor has set up an ‘interest list’ on Facebook of all their journalists so people could keep up-to-date with what their journalists write. Journalists such as Craig Kanalley, Jahnabi Barooah and Rosa Golijan engage with their Facebook subscribers almost at a personal level on a daily basis, thereby increasing visibility to their posts on user’s Facebook feeds.

Engagement and Relevancy

A good news site will pick out the most headline-worthy articles of the day, and give them pride of place on the front page (or main blog/magazine page). Think about this when updating your site – what belongs on your homepage (or main blog page)? And what can be moved deeper within your site?

It’s a rule of thumb that’s worth applying throughout your content – if a page is irrelevant to what you’ve got to offer, it’d be best to retire it, or update it so that it’s relevant to your audience and your business. By keeping a tight focus on the topics you cover, you can demonstrate expertise and relevancy throughout your site to search engines, helping them better understand what your website is about and the industry you operate within.

Make sure all your authors and bloggers have verified authorship on Google Plus. This will help Google’s algorithm distinguish the quality and relevancy of the content. If the blogger or author already possesses a high reputational score with Google, you will increase your site’s visibility and ranking ability for a greater number of keywords.

Opinion and Controversy

Not everyone can court controversy on their website, but blogs are a good place to express opinion and welcome conflicting comments from your readers. Again, take your inspiration from news sites – while many news outlets have a political agenda to push, they typically don’t do so (well, not too obviously…) in their main articles.

Legitimate news providers distinguish between their journalistic reporting and their editorial columns – and on any website, you can create a similar distinction between static content, opinion-based blogs and self-promotional press releases. It helps your reader to understand where you’re coming from, and why some pages might be more opinionated than others – and a little controversy can help to get some commenting going on your blog posts, too.

There is an important distinction to make between news site comments and those on a less formal blog, however. When somebody comments on your personal blog, it’s common practice to reply to them, to keep the conversation going. In contrast, news sites usually rely on interaction between their readers, rather than with the article’s original author – something worth aiming for on your blog, if you can get your readers’ activity levels high enough.

Catering for Fickle Readers

Online readers are impatient – they won’t wade through lengthy prose, even if they’re happy readingWar and Peace in real life. The internet isn’t the place people settle down to enjoy some timeless literature – in fact, they’re more likely to take ‘timeless’ to the other extreme and spend as little time as possible on your page.

Journalists understand this and are trained to use the ‘inverted pyramid’ model in their articles, with the most important information up top for those who don’t read to the end. For SEO it’s a particularly good approach, as the words and phrases you use up top will be given greater significance in choosing your page’s position in the search results.

The headline is a particularly important part of any page – whether it’s a news article or a static web page – as it highlights the main theme of your content. Make sure you’re picking out the key points in your headline, particularly if it doubles as your page’s HTML title and/or URL, as together these can all contribute towards the words and phrases the search engines associate with your page. Like in a news article, sub-headings also help to signpost readers to the sections of the page that include the information they’re looking for.

Remember, print came first, and while SEO has evolved over time much of it is still inspired by the early, print-like days of the internet. Classic page structures like news articles have left a permanent impression on the things search engines and people value.

Always on the Job

Finally, when you step away from your computer, it doesn’t mean your website ceases to exist. A good journalist will often carry around a notepad and jot down ideas for future articles, or make notes if he or she sees anything that might be worth investigating. You should do the same if you come across a timely and relevant issue that might earn you some extra search traffic if you blog about it or mention it on your website.

Many such ideas ultimately get forgotten by website owners, internet marketers and SEO teams, even if they seem unforgettable when you dream them up. By keeping a notepad – or even a note in your phone – handy, you make sure you remember your ideas. And it’s worth it. If you manage to build your online brand successfully enough, you might one day be making a few headlines of your own.

By Shaad Hamid

Read more: http://www.seoptimise.com

Brands Need To Treat Computer Screens Like TV Screens


By Steve Olenski

“Lord knows I am not the smartest person in the world, the brightest bulb, the sharpest knife or any other euphemism you want to trot out connoting intelligence. But one fairly smart thing I said (at least I think it’s somewhat smart) over the past couple of years was that ‘people need to start looking at their computer screen or monitor the same way they look at their TV.”

Not exactly rocket science when you stop and look at your monitor. Is it not a box-shaped item that is akin to your TV set? Of course it is.

And you don’t read TV, do you? Of course you don’t.tv

Well unless you count reading the now incessant scrolls that every news/sports network has on the bottom of its screen.

But by and large you don’t read TV, you watch it. You watch the images. You watch the video. You watch the film.

So why should your computer be any different.

Now, before I go on, let’s one thing perfectly clear. I am in no way espousing the belief that traditional TV is dead; that we’ll be watching TV on our computers in the near future and our current TVs will become antiques.

Nor am I advocating the removal of all text from all Internet sites as fast as humanly possible to be replaced by videos and/or pictures. Being a writer who makes his living off the writing of words which appear on computer screens, I would kind of like to see words stay for a while.

No, I am merely pointing out something I think that has been obvious for quite some time and is now coming to fruition. And that is that people, AKA consumers, AKA the folks who buy your products, services and wares Mr. & Mrs. Brand, prefer to “see” rather than “read” when it comes to the deluge of information they are bombarded with day in, day out on the information super highway. (Boy, that’s an old term, isn’t it?)

The folks at M Booth recently got together with SimplyMeasure to measure consumer engagement data on the Internet and social media networks.

Some highlights of the following infographic which is pretty self-explanatory. (NOTE: The infographic also includes a brief timeline of the “visual revolution” from just the start of 2012 alone.)

  • On Facebook, videos are shared 12 times more than text posts and links combined
  • Photos are Liked twice as much as text only updates
  • 42% of all Tumblr posts are pictures
  • Pinterest, the photo-driven social media phenomenon, is now referring more traffic than TwitterStumbleUponLinkedIn and Google Plus

So, Mr. Brand Marketer & Mrs. Brand Manager and anyone else who is responsible for hits the Internet airwaves – especially those that hit the social media networks, try and remember the computer/TV analogy and instead of “just” posting words, include and image or video to help tell the story.

 

Read more: http://socialmediatoday.com/steve-olenski